KEA



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Kea - Poieessa and the southwest of the island - the bay of Pisses

The bay of Pisses

The road reaches the western shore (10km) at the wide bay of Pi­sses, below the site of Ancient Poieessa (pronounced ‘Pee-ee-essa’). The commanding position of the city can be seen from the beach, looking toward the hill to the south: the acropolis occupied the flat plateau between the church of the Panaghia Sotira (right) at the western end of the hill overlooking the sea, and the low summit where the walls stop to its east (left). The rectangle of walls that descend the slope below, follow the lines of the ancient perimeter walls on the east and west sides; the horizontal line of wall which joins them, however, is recent. The ancient walls would have descended further so as to meet the small harbour at the shore in the south corner of the bay. The few visible surface remains at the acropolis are reached by the path which climbs up to the Panaghia Sotira from the road south out of the bay, after it rounds the headland. In front of the church itself, which is built on the western bastion of the ancient acropolis, the ankle and foot of an ancient statue in Parian marble has been cemented on a masonry post. A mass of rubble shows where the city extended towards the southeast; and the presence of one of the towers in the enceinte of walls is indicated by an ‘ aloni’ or threshing circle which has been built into its semicircular perimeter. Poieessa, which was founded in the 6th century bc, was always a relatively small city; by the 4th century bc it lost its independence to Karthaia, but continued to be inhabited as an important agricultural centre for the fertility of its hinterland. The quantity of lead fishing-net plummets found at the site suggests that it lived also from harvesting the sea.


Kea Island is part of the Cyclades Island Group, Greece.


access

Kea Island, Greece.

All communications with Kea go through the port of Lavrion on the east coast of Attica, to and from which there are frequent connections with the airport (hourly) and Central Athens (half-hourly from the Mavromateon terminal).
The most regular ferry service is operated by the dowdy, doughty vessels of Goutos Lines, supplemented by the Marmaris Express, who, between them, run one daily, early-morning service, with an additional evening service on four days per week. The crossing takes 75 mins. Ferries en route to Kythnos, Syros and the main Cycladic destinations call at Kea on average two times weekly.

Kea Travel Guide

beaches

Kea Island, Greece.

There are plenty organized and not beaches in Kea.
Koundouros beach
Korissia beach
Pisses beach

Gialiskari beach
Kambi beach
Orkos beach
Kastellakia beach

Kea Travel Guide

eating

Kea Island, Greece.

Two of the best places to eat on the island are in Vourkári: the popular Aristos, on the water front, and—with fresh est and the most varied offers—Strophi tou Mimi, on the bend where the road turns inland for Otziás. Lagoudera, on the quay opposite the ferry landing in Korissía, is a well-frequented taverna with a good variety of mezes.

Kea Travel Guide

lodging

Kea Island, Greece.

The charming simple hotel has not yet arrived on Kea.
The best option at the upper end of the scale is the 4-star complex, Porto Kea Suites (T. 22880 22870–1, fax 22873, www.portokea-suites.com); and in the middle category the Hotel Brillante Zoï, (T. 22880 22685, fax 22687, www.hotelbrillante.gr). Both have pleasant management and are in the port town of Korissía.
For studios to rent, the Oasis Hotel (T. 22880 21295, fax 21717) on the road from Korissía to Gialiskári is clean and comfortable.

Kea Travel Guide

museums

Kea Island, Greece.

Archaeological Museum

Kea Travel Guide

practical info

Kea Island, Greece.

840 02 Kea, Keos or Tzia: area 131sq km; perimeter 88km; resident population 2,158; max. altitude 562m. Port Authority: T. 22880 21344. Travel and information: Mouzaki Shipping Agency, T. 22880 21920–1, www.kea.gr

Kea Travel Guide

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