KIMOLOS



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Kimolos - west of the islando - Ellenika Archaeological area

Ellenika Archaeological area

The road west from Psathi passes through cuttings in the volcanic earth with brilliant striations of orange and dark red, and enters a landscape where, among the variety of colours of earth, white and pale green predominate. At Aliki (2.5km) is a small salt-pan, which fills in the spring and dries in summer; there is some fresh water and a break of shade for the beach. The landscape around is filled with odd outcrops of eroded rock sheltering stone crofts in their lea, which are well-camouflaged and often bursting with cactus trees.
   Beyond Aliki the road becomes a track and drops down to the western shore of the island at Dekas and Mavrospi­lia Bays, which look across to the north coast of Milos. Their sandy beaches are in effect two parts of the same bay, divided in the middle by a small promontory of pumice which falters and fragments into needles of rock standing in the water: in antiquity it formed a continuity of land, joining the off-shore islet of Daskaleio, or Aghios Andreas, to the main island. This was the site of Ancient Kimolos—an area referred to today as Ellenika. Subsidence and erosion have meant that the main site of the ancient city lies under the water between the promontory and the islet, leaving only the area of the cemeteries on shore. The islet of Aghios Andreas may have been the site of a sanctuary of Athena Polias which, according to a Hellenistic inscription found on Euboea, was the principal place of cult on Kimolos. When James Theodore Bent visited Daskaleio in 1882 he wrote that the islet ‘was covered with ancient houses, broken statues, and graves at the bottom of the sea; as we rowed across we could distinctly see a lovely sarcophagus, which the boatmen told us they had often tried but never succeeded in raising’. Some trace of these remains is to be seen on the surface of the islet today, but most have been buried. A number of eroded grave-loculi can be made out in the friable rock on the very tip of the promontory opposite, and the foundations of walls can be seen in the shallow water along the shore.

A Mycenaean cemetery and vase-sherds from the 13th century bc indicate that there was also a passing Bronze Age presence here. The most remarkable finds, however, are from the Geometric Age—20 cremation burials, containing over 200 vases of the 9th and 8th centuries bc. They constitute one of the richest collections of Geometric pottery found so far in the Cyclades. A number of rare grave stelai in volcanic stone of the same period (c. 700 bc) have also been found; they are part carved, and were possibly part-painted originally, depicting figures with arms in positions which are coincidentally reminiscent of Cycladic figurines. The cemeteries around the bays continued to be used through the Classical and Hellenistic periods.
 
The Bay of Mavrospi­lia (‘black cave’) takes its name from the cave at its far northern end. Walking towards this, Theodore Bent found buried in the sand a ‘well-formed glazed kylix, which gladdened our hearts and sent us on our way rejoicing’.


Kimolos Island is part of the Cyclades Island Group, Greece.


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access

Kimolos Island, Greece.

The easiest access to Kimolos is via Milos, which is amply connected by air and ferry to the mainland and other islands.
The F/B Panaghia Phaneromeni makes 5–6 crossings daily from Pollónia (in northeast Milos) to Kimolos; it accommodates vehicles, and the journey takes 25 mins.
Ventouris Lines runs two morning services (6 hrs 30 mins), and G.A. Ferries one afternoon service (7 hrs), per week from Piraeus to Kimolos.
This is supplemented in the summer season by two weekly services by Aegean Speed Lines (4 hrs 30 mins).
All these services continue to Milos going south and to Siphnos and Seriphos going north.

Kimolos Travel Guide

beaches

Kimolos Island, Greece.

Ellenika Beach
Dekas Beach
Psathi Beach
Aliki Beach
Bonatsa Beach
Kalamitsi Beach
Prassa (hot springs)

Kimolos Travel Guide

eating

Kimolos Island, Greece.

Taverna "Panórama", at the heart of Chorió, is busy and serves a fresh local wine, which is delicious and of a deep golden colour, to accompany its simple home cook.
A couple of the shops in Chora sell the island"s excel lent goats" cheeses, ranging in intensity from a soft fresh "pattie", to a seasoned and pungent, flaky hard cheese. Both the wine and the cheeses are excellent.

Kimolos Travel Guide

lodging

Kimolos Island, Greece.

The island offers only basic lodging. Sardis Rooms at Aliki is pleasantly set near the island’s south-facing beach; the rooms are simple, and there is a taverna run by the owners (T. 22870 51458).
Nearer to habitation, Villa Maria on the road between the harbour and Chorió (T. 22870 51392, fax 51752, www. hellasislands.gr/kimolos/villa maria) is an inexpensive and welcoming alternative.

Kimolos Travel Guide

practical info

Kimolos Island, Greece.

840 04 Kimolos: area 37sq km; perimeter 45km; resident population 838; max. altitude 365m. Port Authority: T. 22870 51219. Information: www. kimolos-island.com.

Kimolos Travel Guide

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