KOS



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Kos - Antimachia and the West of the Island - Antimachia, Mastichari and Kardamaina - Kardamaina

Kardamaina
5km south of Antimachia, has both Early Christian and ancient remains. The village and harbour, which provides a year-round ferry service across to Nisyros, have been engulfed by a disproportionate expansion of building and tourist infrastructure along the coast, leaving Kardamaina with little natural appeal beyond its sandy beaches and setting. In the process of this expansion evidence has come to light of no less than three Palaeochristian basilicas in the area. The floor-plan of the most accessible of these, the 5th century Aghia Theotis, is to be seen 50m northwest of the square beside the port in a block bounded by Kanari and Patmou Streets. It was a three-aisled basilica with narthex and baptistery to its west. The other two lay southwest of Kardamaina, on the site of the ancient city of Halasarna (reached by following the shore less than 1km along the road that crosses the watercourse just west of the town centre). The ancient settlement grew up between the shore and the bluff behind, which functioned as its acropolis. The site has only been partially uncovered and is pressed upon by modern construction; but it has already revealed some striking remains. There are several levels: most easily distinguish able by eye are the houses of the Early Christian era, which are built over the sharper, meticulous masonry of the Hellenistic buildings below. In the southwest corner is the lower part of a beautifully constructed, 2nd century bc marble public building (probably not a temple), whose base is constructed in an unusual red stone. North and east of this within the area, a 3rd century bc Temple of Apollo Halasarnas is being unearthed. At the upper level of excavation are the remains of houses, a basilica and a cemetery of the Early Christian era. On the far side of the acropolis hill, traces of the late Hellenistic theatre have been identified; the ruined apse of yet another EarlyChristian basilica, stands in the fields between the Apollon Hotel and the acropolis hill. Although systematic excavations by the University of Athens have only just begun to uncover the extent of the remains, it is clear that the whole area was densely inhabited in Antiquity.

 

 


Kos Island is part of the Dodecanese Island group
Kardamaina.


Random information you might what to know about Kos Island
Ancient port baths
Eleutherias Square

 

access

Kos Island, Greece.

By air: Kos has an international airport in the centre of the island at a distance of 23 km from Kos Town, with twice daily connections from Athens by both Olympic Air and Aegean Airlines, and charter arrivals from many destinations in Northern Europe. There are also local (Olympic)flights three times weekly to Astypalaia, Leros and Rhodes.
   By boat: There are daily services by catamaran (Dodecanese Express), and four times weekly by car ferry (F/B Nisos Kalymnos), plying the route between Rhodes, Kos, Kalymnos, Leros, Patmos (& Samos – ferry only): to Piraeus and Rhodes, Blue Star Ferries run four times weekly ferries, and GA Ferries (who include Nisyros, Tilos and Symi en route) three times weekly. The faster Flying Dolphin services link Kos also with the smaller Dodecanese Islands between Samos in the north and Rhodes in the south, and run daily in summer. From Kardamaina on the southeast coast there is a daily connection with Nisyros throughout the year, weather permitting.

Kos Travel Guide

eating

Kos Island, Greece.

In the town centre, for inexpensive and genuine fare, with good fresh, local wine, the small taverna Kriti (just below the steps northwest of the central church of Aghia Paraskevì) on Ypsilantou Street is reliable and convivial: while, nearby, the Kafeneion Aenaos in front of the Deftedar Mosque, opposite the Central Market building, makes a proper Greek coffee. Many of the most interesting and enjoyable places to eat, however, are a little out of the centre; for a delightful rural, courtyard setting, the Taverna Ambavris (in Ambavris, 1 km along the road south (left) from just beyond the Casa Romana /Roman House as you approach it from the centre of town) is to be recommended; while at the crossroads in Platani, (1.7 km from the port along the road to the Asklepieion), Ali"s is a Turkish restaurant with some good quasi-Turkish dishes, very popular with locals for Sunday lunch. To Palaio Pyli, 1 km below Palaio Pyli, has good fish, hospitable welcome and a good sunset view. With comparable sunset view, home-grown wine and home-made traditional dishes, the quiet and friendly -Taverna Panorama (2.5 km up the Asfendiou road from Zipari) in a family house and garden, is highly recommended. It is perhaps the most genuine place on the island to eat.

Kos Travel Guide

further reading

Kos Island, Greece.

Susan Sherwin-White’s Ancient Cos – an Historical Study etc. (the most authoritative and detailed study of the island in Antiquity); Vassilis Colonas, Italian Architecture in the Dodecanese Islands (Olkos Press, Athens, 2002), for the buildings and architectural ideas of the Italian occupation; the Hippocratic Corpus, selected and translated as The Medical Works of Hippocrates, by Chadwick and Mann (Oxford, Blackwell).

Kos Travel Guide

lodging

Kos Island, Greece.

Outside of the tourist complexes, the most comfortable place to stay in Kos is at the Kos Aktis Hotel (T.22420 47200; www.kosaktis.gr) which is stylish and modern, and has a good restaurant; it is conveniently and centrally placed near the castle, and all its rooms have balconies overlooking the shore towards the Turkish coast. The price is moderate to expensive. For the hospitality, friendliness and helpfulness of the owner, the family-run Hotel Afendoulis (T.22420 25321, fax 25797), just in from the shore to the south of the centre on Evripidou Street, is a pleasant guest-house, but with basic rooms (inexpensive).

Kos Travel Guide

practical info

Kos Island, Greece.

85 300 Kos: area 287sq km; perimeter 112km; resident population 26,379; maximum altitude 843m.
Port Authority: T. 22420 26594–7 & 24185.
Travel and information: Panos Tours, T. 22420 23078, fax 28068.

Kos Travel Guide

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