KOS



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Kos - The area of the altar of Dionysos

The area of the Altar of Dionysos
Visible in a sunken area below the pine trees across Grigori­ou V Street to the northeast of the Casa Romana and Central Baths, is the base of the Altar of Dionysos, which faced due east with a ramp for access from the west. This would have been a low structure of a broad Ξ  shape, with two levels in the interior so as to provide a wide ledge for offers, surrounded by a flat cornice, with a carved relief run ning in segments just below depicting an Amazonamachia with Dionysos and his followers (now in the Antiquarium of the Knights’ Castle). This design and decoration has led to the suggestion that the altar and its temple were gifts from the Attalid rulers of Pergamon in the 2nd century bc.A small, Doric temple—possibly the one dedicated to Dionysos—stood just to the north and east. Elements of its entablature, as well as a fragment of an elaborate caryatid like figure, lie on the ground in the vicinity.
   The surroundings are dotted with new areas of excavation. North along Vasili­ou Pavlou Street can be seen (right) the southern extremity of the agora at the point where its clearly defined colonnade base turns west; to the east on Vi­ronos Street has been revealed an area of civic buildings and workshops—one of which was for the production of pigments, including an early manufactured colour used extensively in wall paintings known as ‘Egyptian Blue’; while, in the park to south of the church of Aghia Paraskevi­, are the remains of an apsidal structure of the late Roman period. However, the finds in this area are not all from the Hellenistic period: Bronze Age houses have been revealed at a site beside the intersection of Pisandrou and Kleopatras Streets, 100m to the west. Excavations continue all over the town—many in the res idential area around Argyrokastrou Street, to the west of the acropolis hill.
   From the Altar of Dionysos, the curve of Korai Street (the extension of Grigori­ou V Street) returns to the point by the Albergo Gelsomino where this itinerary began.


Kos Island is part of the Dodecanese Island group
The area of the altar of Dionysos.


Random information you might what to know about Kos Island
Eleutherias Square
Kardamaina

 

access

Kos Island, Greece.

By air: Kos has an international airport in the centre of the island at a distance of 23 km from Kos Town, with twice daily connections from Athens by both Olympic Air and Aegean Airlines, and charter arrivals from many destinations in Northern Europe. There are also local (Olympic)flights three times weekly to Astypalaia, Leros and Rhodes.
   By boat: There are daily services by catamaran (Dodecanese Express), and four times weekly by car ferry (F/B Nisos Kalymnos), plying the route between Rhodes, Kos, Kalymnos, Leros, Patmos (& Samos – ferry only): to Piraeus and Rhodes, Blue Star Ferries run four times weekly ferries, and GA Ferries (who include Nisyros, Tilos and Symi en route) three times weekly. The faster Flying Dolphin services link Kos also with the smaller Dodecanese Islands between Samos in the north and Rhodes in the south, and run daily in summer. From Kardamaina on the southeast coast there is a daily connection with Nisyros throughout the year, weather permitting.

Kos Travel Guide

eating

Kos Island, Greece.

In the town centre, for inexpensive and genuine fare, with good fresh, local wine, the small taverna Kriti (just below the steps northwest of the central church of Aghia Paraskevì) on Ypsilantou Street is reliable and convivial: while, nearby, the Kafeneion Aenaos in front of the Deftedar Mosque, opposite the Central Market building, makes a proper Greek coffee. Many of the most interesting and enjoyable places to eat, however, are a little out of the centre; for a delightful rural, courtyard setting, the Taverna Ambavris (in Ambavris, 1 km along the road south (left) from just beyond the Casa Romana /Roman House as you approach it from the centre of town) is to be recommended; while at the crossroads in Platani, (1.7 km from the port along the road to the Asklepieion), Ali"s is a Turkish restaurant with some good quasi-Turkish dishes, very popular with locals for Sunday lunch. To Palaio Pyli, 1 km below Palaio Pyli, has good fish, hospitable welcome and a good sunset view. With comparable sunset view, home-grown wine and home-made traditional dishes, the quiet and friendly -Taverna Panorama (2.5 km up the Asfendiou road from Zipari) in a family house and garden, is highly recommended. It is perhaps the most genuine place on the island to eat.

Kos Travel Guide

further reading

Kos Island, Greece.

Susan Sherwin-White’s Ancient Cos – an Historical Study etc. (the most authoritative and detailed study of the island in Antiquity); Vassilis Colonas, Italian Architecture in the Dodecanese Islands (Olkos Press, Athens, 2002), for the buildings and architectural ideas of the Italian occupation; the Hippocratic Corpus, selected and translated as The Medical Works of Hippocrates, by Chadwick and Mann (Oxford, Blackwell).

Kos Travel Guide

lodging

Kos Island, Greece.

Outside of the tourist complexes, the most comfortable place to stay in Kos is at the Kos Aktis Hotel (T.22420 47200; www.kosaktis.gr) which is stylish and modern, and has a good restaurant; it is conveniently and centrally placed near the castle, and all its rooms have balconies overlooking the shore towards the Turkish coast. The price is moderate to expensive. For the hospitality, friendliness and helpfulness of the owner, the family-run Hotel Afendoulis (T.22420 25321, fax 25797), just in from the shore to the south of the centre on Evripidou Street, is a pleasant guest-house, but with basic rooms (inexpensive).

Kos Travel Guide

practical info

Kos Island, Greece.

85 300 Kos: area 287sq km; perimeter 112km; resident population 26,379; maximum altitude 843m.
Port Authority: T. 22420 26594–7 & 24185.
Travel and information: Panos Tours, T. 22420 23078, fax 28068.

Kos Travel Guide

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