KYTHNOS



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Kythnos - general

Kythnos

After Kea, Kythnos is the closest of the Cycladic islands to Athens, yet surprisingly it is one of the least developed. With a population big enough to give it a stable sense of community, the island has a peaceful rhythm of life which has changed little over time. Tranquillity, simplicity and spaciousness prevail. The major monuments are few and the archaeology, though important, has less to show than that of its neighbours: but the island’s particular qualities are its unpretentious and traditional island-life, and its beautiful and panoramic landscape. There is an unaffected genuineness to the hospitality of the islanders which is becoming harder to find elsewhere in the Cyclades.  
   Life centres on the quiet port of Merichas and on two attractive villages in the interior—Kythnos Chora and Dryopis—or ‘Dryopida’, as it is called in demotic Greek. Chora, especially, is endowed with a number of elegant 17th century churches, several of which contain conteporaneous icons of great quality produced by the work shop of the Skordilis brothers, who perfected a graceful fusion of Cretan and Venetian styles. The most conspicuous historical remains are at the site of Ancient Kythnos at Vryokastro on the west coast, and further north at the remote, dramatic and precipitous ‘Kastro tis Orias’ which was the island’s Byzantine capital. There are also plentiful hot water springs both in the northeast and the west of the island which gave rise to the name ‘Thermia’ by which the island was known in later Byzantine times and after. The island’s repeatedly indented coastline affords a wide variety of small coves and beaches—narrower and steep er on the west coast, gentler on the eastern side. They are mostly unshaded, but have fine sand or shingle and limpid water.


Kythnos Island is part of the Cyclades Island Group, Greece.


access

Kythnos Island, Greece.

GA Ferries and Ventouris Lines run direct services (4 hrs) en route to the other Western Cyclades on alternate days, which together provide daily connections with Piraeus by car ferry. There is also a twice weekly service to Lavrion (via Kea) operated by Goutos Lines.

Kythnos Travel Guide

beaches

Kythnos Island, Greece.

Kolona beach, the most famous beach on the Island.
Loutra Beach
Kanala Beach
Episkopi Beach
Agia Eirini Beach
Kalo Livadi Beach (Liotrivi)

Kythnos Travel Guide

eating

Kythnos Island, Greece.

 

A variety of home-cooking with dishes and salads made with localredients (especially the island"s cheeses, such as the piquant kopanisti) can be had at Araxavoli, by the harbour at Loutrá; Gialos, on the harbour-front at Mérichas, is welcoming and has a more regular fare which is well-prepared. Neither has local wine. Though unpromising from outside, the very simple taverna, Pelegra, in the main calle of Dryopida, close to the church, provides local wine, home-made cheese (trimma—a soft, slightly fermented feta cheese), and fresh local meats. Towards sunset the taverna above Apokrousi Bay is a memorable and panoramic spot to eat.

Kythnos Travel Guide

lodging

Kythnos Island, Greece.

The island’s only proper hotel (Meltemi at Loutrá) is dowdy. The best solution to lodging is presented by the rooms or studios offered in the two principal villages.
Filoxenia Studios in Chora (Kythnos) are comfortable and attractively furnished (T. 22810 31644, www.filoxenia-kithnos. gr; open all year). Close to the beach and hot springs at Loutrá are the Porto Klaras apartments and studios (T. 22810 31355; Easter to Oct only).

Kythnos Travel Guide

practical info

Kythnos Island, Greece.

840 06 Kythnos: area 99sq km; perimeter 111km;
resident population 1538; max. altitude 355m. Port
Authority: T. 22810 32290. Information: Thermia
Travel (T. 22810 32345), www.kythnos-island.com

Kythnos Travel Guide

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